Peter Pan & Wendy Remake News, Release Date, Cast, Plot, and Spoilers


Just as Peter Pan vows to never grow up, movies about him are proving just as resistant to age out of Hollywood. Disney continues to adapt its catalog of classic animated films with Peter Pan & Wendy, and the next live-action movie will live on Disney+. It was confirmed on Disney Investor Day that the project will stream exclusively on the service and star Yara Shahidi’s Tinker Bell and Jude Law’s Captain Hook.

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Relative newcomers Ever Anderson and Alexander Molony were cast as Wendy Darling and Peter Pan, respectively, back in March. Below, everything we know about the new film, including how it will re-imagine the classic fairytale.

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Who’s involved?

Sources tell Variety that Anderson (who is the daughter of actress Milla Jovovich and will reportedly play the younger version of Scarlett Johansson in Black Widow) has been cast as Wendy. Meanwhile, Molony (Disney Junior series Claude) will play Peter Pan himself.

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Yara Shahidi (Grown-ish, The Sun Is Also A Star) will play Tinkerbell, per Deadline. Her role has previously been played by Julia Roberts in Hook.

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Law has been cast as the villainous Captain Hook, Variety reports, a role previously assumed by Dustin Hoffman in 1991, Christopher Walken in 2014, and Garrett Hedlund in 2015.

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Newcomer Alyssa Wapanatâhk is on board to play Tiger Lily, a source told TheWrap; sources said the character is “being reimagined” for the remake.

Deadline reported back in April 2016 that Pete’s Dragon filmmaker David Lowery would direct and co-write the script with his collaborator on that film, Toby Halbrooks. Jim Whitaker (Pete’s Dragon, A Wrinkle in Time) will produce the project.

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Lowery and Halbrooks in 2015.

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What is Peter & Wendy about?

No official synopsis has been provided for the new iteration of the film. However, the project will have plenty of source material to draw inspiration from. Based on the 1904 play and 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie, the tale of the boy in green who refused to grow up and transports the Darling children to Neverland has been told countless times.

In addition to the classic 1953 animated film and its 2002 follow-up Return to Neverland, there have been several film adaptations (Spielberg’s Hook in 1991, 2015’s Pan, and 2020’s Wendy among them). Plus, who could forget the stage musicals (1954’s Peter Pan, Peter and the Starcatcher, and Finding Neverland among them) and NBC’s Peter Pan Live! in 2014?

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Allison Williams in Peter Pan Live!

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When and where will the film be released?

We’ll have to wait a little longer before learning when Peter & Wendy will be released. But the movie will live on Disney+, despite sources telling Variety earlier this year that it was “expected” to premiere in theaters.

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Little Mermaid Live-Action Movie News, Cast, and Details


Disney is getting ready to go back Under the Sea with The Little Mermaid. The brand is adding to its growing list of live-action remakes with a new take on the beloved 1989 animated classic. Now, the principal cast for the new movie is officially set, with Halle Bailey as Ariel, Jonah Hauer-King as Prince Eric, Melissa McCarthy as Ursula, Javier Bardem as King Triton and more.

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Here’s everything you need to know about The Little Mermaid remake.

Who’s in the cast?

In July 2019, Disney announced that Bailey, one-half of the singing duo Chloe x Halle and a Grown-ish star, was cast to play Ariel. “After an extensive search, it was abundantly clear that Halle possesses that rare combination of spirit, heart, youth, innocence, and substance—plus a glorious singing voice—all intrinsic qualities necessary to play this iconic role,” the film’s director, Rob Marshall (Into the Woods, Chicago), said in a statement at the time. Halle announced the news on Twitter, writing, “dream come true…”

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“I feel like I’m dreaming and I’m just grateful and I don’t pay attention to the negativity,” Bailey told Variety after a racist controversy followed her casting announcement. “I just feel like this role was something bigger than me and greater and it’s going to be beautiful. I’m just so excited to be a part of it.”

Jacob Tremblay and Awkwafina will play two of Ariel’s close friends. Tremblay, who has starred in Before I Wake and The Book of Henry, will voice Flounder, while rapper and Crazy Rich Asians star Awkwafina will voice Scuttle.

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On November 12, The Hollywood Reporter confirmed that Hauer-King had been cast as Ariel’s love interest Prince Eric, rounding out the movie’s major roles. Earlier this year, The Wrap reported that Harry Styles had turned down the role, and Deadline reported in September that Cameron Cuffe (Krypton) and Hauer-King (2017’s Little Women) both tested for it as well.

In July, Variety reported that Oscar winner Bardem was “circling” the role of Ariel’s father, King Triton. McCarthy will play Ursula, the main antagonist in the film, after news broke in June that she was “in talks” to join the reboot as the Sea Witch. In October 2019, Variety reported that the voice singing “Under the Sea” would belong to Hamilton‘s Daveed Diggs. The actor, who also appeared in Wonder and Blindspotting, will play Ariel’s crab friend Sebastian.

Will there be new original songs?

In addition to hearing the iconic songs from composer Alan Menken and the late lyricist Howard Ashman, Hamilton‘s Lin-Manuel Miranda will work with Menken on new music. This will be Miranda’s second Disney project, following his Oscar-nominated work on Moana in 2016. That same year, Miranda talked about being tapped for the job with Vulture. “This came out of a conversation with Disney, and basically they were like, ‘There’s no bigger fan of this movie than you, and no bigger public supporter,'” he recalled, tweeting updates about the project in the years since.

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When will it come out?

Disney hasn’t announced an official release date for the Little Mermaid live-action film, but McCarthy confirmed that the movie had been shooting prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. “For The Little Mermaid, hopefully, if everything is…safe, we go back to shooting in January in London, which is very exciting, which is very exciting,” she told Andy Cohen on Watch What Happens Live.

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She went on to describe her experience playing the tentacled character. “I have such an affection for Ursula,” McCarthy said. “I know she’s the villain, but I’ve just always kind of been like, ‘Oh my god.’ I mean, she’s kind of delicious to play. I’m just kind of doing it as if I could be like the vaudevillian night club act that lives in my heart. It’s just so fun, you can’t go too far with her and I’m excited to see it.”

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Before The Prom, Meryl Streep Was the Hero I Needed


In the winter of 2009, I made a list. I grabbed a piece of scrap paper from my parents’ kitchen desk and wrote down every single Meryl Streep movie that existed on the internet. Every weekend, I shut myself in my bedroom to reach beyond what I viewed as a limiting Midwestern upbringing.

I started with The Bridges of Madison County, the movie that first drew me to Meryl years earlier. She plays Francesca, an Italian woman who moves to America after World War II to marry an Iowan farmer. The character reminded me of my grandmother Marjorie—she left her lush, coastal home in British Columbia to settle with my grandfather in Missouri, where she raised three kids, cooked all the meals, baked all the treats, worked as a nurse, and sewed costumes for the local theater. After she turned 70 and her dementia worsened, she would reach for the phone book to call her mother, who’d been dead for decades. She’d ask me, then a pre-teen, if she could go down to the dock to get a bucket of shrimp, something she hadn’t done since she was a little girl. It broke my heart to see her miss the place that was the essence of who she was. In Streep’s Francesca, I saw a woman who, like my grandmother, loved her home but also longed to leave it.

My grandmother died when I was 13. By then, I had found Meryl, whose storytelling helped me better understand the woman who believed in fairies and dreamed of something else. Something more.

So, I made my list. I wanted to visit as many worlds apart from my own as possible, and Meryl could take me there. As I made my way down—Out of Africa, Death Becomes Her, The Hours—I got curious about the woman behind these characters. Who was this actress who offered escape from my hometown, who told me stories and helped me think beyond the confines of my own experiences? She felt safe.

Around the same time, I came across a YouTube clip of The Rosie O’Donnell Show from 1996. Julie Andrews was the guest, and O’Donnell told her that, after her mom died when she was 10, she and her siblings would wish for their dad to find his own Maria VonTrapp. “It was, like, my fantasy that you would come and be my mom and live in my house and make me clothes out of curtains,” O’Donnell says.

That was exactly how I felt about Meryl. She would understand all the questions in my head about my sexuality. I could talk to her about my crushes on girls and my fear of saying the word “lesbian” out loud. Maybe we’d go for a walk by the ocean and talk about my fantasies of living in a lighthouse with my wife. I was terrified to tell my parents about any of this, but Meryl would get it. Someone who could live inside so many different people, someone who created characters driven by empathy, someone who could bring back my magical grandmother, could save me.

the prom l to r andrew rannells as trent oliver, kerry washington as mrs greene, keegan michael key as mr hawkins, meryl streep as dee dee allen, jo ellen pellman as emma, james corden as barry glickman in the prom cr netflix © 2020

Meryl Streep as Dee Dee Allen in The Prom.

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A few months after I’d completed my list of Meryl movies, my mentor, teacher, and parent-figure died by suicide. In January 2010, another friend died suddenly. She was 18. People in my life told me it would get better. I had a sweet boyfriend who made me a scavenger hunt to ask me to prom and read books aloud while we cuddled on the couch. But my confusion over my sexuality only deepened and doubled as I mourned these losses. I hid in my grief. I had fantasies, all the time, of Meryl coming to save me.

When I watched the trailer for The Prom, the memories of those painful teenage years resurfaced. I would’ve given anything for Meryl to save me from my town, from my grief, from my internalized homophobia. In the film, Streep’s character, Broadway star Dee Dee Allen, isn’t exactly the perfect ally. She only goes to small-town Indiana to advocate for Emma Nolan, a high-schooler shut out of prom for trying to bring her girlfriend, to gain positive publicity for her faltering career. Dee Dee doesn’t know what the letters in LGTBQ stand for, she doesn’t remember Emma’s name, and she initially mistakes the teen for a completely different person. But seeing Streep in this role, belting out the word “lesbian” in celebration, brought me back to the days I’d stand in front of the bathroom mirror and eek it out in a whisper.

My friend Robbie (who would’ve made a much better Barry Glickman than James Corden, by the way), didn’t have the option to hide his queerness. He just was. “Coming out was sort of a ‘duh’ moment for me—being flamboyant and all, it was no surprise to anyone,” he told me in a recent email. Although we never discussed it in high school, Robbie, like me, had his own Meryls: “I long adored Jack McFarland and Karen Walker of Will & Grace—I saw myself in Jack and admired his connection with Karen. I even had a fascination with Roseanne Barr (before she was an outward racist), because her show embodied my middle-class upbringing with strong female archetypes.” Most kids at our school were not nice when it came to being different. Being gay was usually discussed as a punchline, and this scared me. I focused on being good at sports and school and not letting my parents see me fail. If Robbie was Barry, I was Alyssa Greene.

When I asked Robbie if he ever thought about talking to these people, he said he generally didn’t believe in meeting his heroes. However, he wouldn’t turn down a “cathartic hug and sob, and definitely a drink” from Sean Hayes and Megan Mullaly.

I did have my Meryl moment. In 2014, Indiana University Bloomington gave her an honorary degree. I took a friend of mine whose sister went to IU, and we made an overnight trip from Missouri. I wrote her a thank-you note, mostly because I knew the teen version of me would’ve wanted me to. I never intended to give it to her, but when someone onstage identified her husband nearby, I sheepishly walked up and handed him the sealed note. He said he’d give it to her, but I don’t know if he did. I don’t know if she read it. If she did, I hope she understood that she was a lifeline for a very scared kid growing up in the Midwest. Before she was Dee Dee Allen on film, she was that character for me.

I’m 28 now. I’ve worked at major publications and interviewed many celebrities, and the overall sheen of mystery they had when I was growing up in the middle of the country is pretty much gone. They’re people, many of them wonderfully interesting, cool, creative people. But people. Yet like Rosie O’Donnell with Julie Andrews, I’ll always have that fantasy of Meryl coming to save me from my problems. And I’ll always be grateful that, in a way, she did.

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